wake up early


Mike (left) remained incredibly enthusiastic on the Metro North ride up via the Hudson Line to the famed Dia:Beacon art museum in Beacon, New York on Sunday. Delish, on the right, played the role of Little Red Riding Hood.

• The Dia:Beacon greeted our group (Kyle, Lisa, Jenn, Lehman, Mike, Ben, and I) with a surprising top-shelf brunch on Sunday morning, consisting of unlimited bloody marys (with rosemary-infused vodka), excellent baked-filo pastries, and some ham-and-horseradish-mustard baguettes. The actual museum space, living up to everyone’s hype, is massive, and worthy of the trek. Many large-scale pieces line the walls of this former Nabisco factory-turned-remote-gallery. Alright, enough with the hyphens. I ran into a coworker, Pauline, just before Jenn and I scored free tickets from a nice woman to a sold out dance performance in the building by the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. While I wasn’t really feeling any of the dancing, it did feel significant that John Cage historically maintained ties with the company, and had created the music for this piece. The Dia also has some Richard Serra steel creations, plus the best-looking Louis Bourgoise welded enormous spider I’ve seen yet (better than those in the Tate Modern last year).

• On the subject of music, I picked up the newest Atmosphere, after WOXY was playing “Painting” a few times on their evening set. While it lacks anthems, it does get a little better on a second listen. It’s definitely not that Epitaph sound Slug accidentally picked up a few albums back. Personally I still think nothing is as golden as the Lucy Ford EPs a few years back, but, that being said, impressive that he’s still dropping albums on the regular, about a decade later.

• On Saturday, Jenn and I caught up with Brian and Rachel to do brunch over at Hi-Life in the Upper West Side before catching a performance of Len, Asleep in Vinyl, up on 76th and Broadway. Cheers to comp tickets. The play was set in the remote mountain cabin of an aging record producer, who is visited by his rockstar son, and a few other odd characters. While the acting was stiff (and bad) the first few minutes, it got pretty interesting for the rest of the brief 75-minute duration. The crowd was super old, and maybe received a different meaning from the performance, but the four of us definitely enjoyed it. Personally I’m a sucker for the lodge aesthetic. Exposed woodgrain and taxidermy taps into that inner, partially-constructed nostalgia. (The only taxidermy ever in my parents’ home were a few large fish on plaques, collecting dust. Though, there were many wood-paneled walls).

• While I don’t have a photo to show evidence of this, there’s been a recent trend of cutting subway platform advertising to form new hybrid ads. For example, cutting out Harrison Ford’s face from the new Indiana Jones film, and putting it on the face of a dog being walked by some fashionista, etc. Of course, you can also find this supplemented by the normal dozen speech bubbles and such. There’s certainly a correlation of this minor vandalism with the frequency of trains on these lines. I’m talking the L, G, and C trains for the most part. Late at night, might as well start making some new ads: they aren’t wheat-pasted, they’re self-adhesive vinyl. Collage-away. (Though they did call the police on me once at an L station a few months back).

• This evening in Key Food on Avenue B:
cashier 1: (concerned) I think there’s a stalker.
cashier 2: really? where?
cashier 1: here, I mean, he comes in and says hi, and then waits for me to leave.
cashier 2: (sad) oh, him? he never even talks to me.


The BAM Harvey Theatre is located on Fulton in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.


Astoria, Queens, circa 2005 when I had just moved to New York. There used to be weird stuff over in Queens, like random chickens in alleyways and stuff (though, just today my boss mentioned a family who keeps chickens in the basement of their Lower East Side building).